11 Words Meaning More Than “Like” But Less Than “Love”

“Love” is a strong word. “Like” isn’t a strong enough word. There’s a happy bit in between that we often want to use for some people, but we might not know what the words are. This article will help you to come up with some good alternatives for this problem.

Which Words Mean More Than “Like” But Less Than “Love”?

There are a few great words we can use that are in the middle of “like” and “love.” Why not try out some of the following:

  • Fond
  • Admire
  • Adore
  • Infatuated
  • Fancy
  • Charmed
  • Care for
  • Respect
  • Appreciate
  • Think the world of
  • Have a soft spot for
Words Meaning More Than “Like” But Less Than “Love”

The preferred version is “fond.” It works well to show that we have feelings toward someone that are a little more than “like” but not quite as intense as “love.” While “love” might one day develop, it doesn’t have to (depending on your relationship).

Watch the video: Only 1 percent of ...
Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

Fond

“Fond” is a simple word that bridges the gap between “like” and “love.” We can use it to refer to our friends that we’re really close to, even if there is never a chance for “love” to be an option between us.

The definition of “fond,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to like someone or something very much; to like doing something.”

These examples will help you with this one:

  • I’m so fond of you. I wish you could stay with me here forever.
  • I truly am fond of you all. I don’t know what I’d do without you.
  • She is apparently very fond of you, which is why I think it’s time you have a little conversation with her!

Admire

“Admire” works well to show that you have a lot of respect for somebody. It can work when we are impressed with their choices or actions around us. The better their behavior, the more likely we will “admire” them.

The definition of “admire,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to respect and approve of someone or their behavior.”

These examples will help you make more sense of this one:

  • I admire you so much, and I wish I could be more like you.
  • I admire my teacher, and I always tell her just how much I appreciate her methods.
  • You really do admire him, don’t you? Why don’t you talk to him more?

Adore

“Adore” is a great word that is somewhere between “like” and “love.” It works well when describing how we feel about our friends because we “adore” them in our lives. Usually, that means they’ve had a large impact on us.

The definition of “adore,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to love someone very much, especially in a way that shows a lot of admiration or respect, or to like something very much.”

Check out these examples if you want to see more:

  • I adore you more than you know, and that’s why I think we’ll always be friends.
  • I truly do adore you all, and I’m so grateful that I get to call you all my best pals.
  • She adores me. She said so herself! If only I could find a way to turn that to love.

Infatuated

“Infatuated” works to talk about a strong feeling that’s close to “love,” but not quite there. Usually, infatuation doesn’t last, which is why it’s not the best choice on this list. However, if we are swept away briefly by our feelings, this word could work well.

The definition of “infatuated,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “having a very strong but not usually lasting feeling of love or attraction for someone or something.”

Check out these examples to see it work:

  • I’m infatuated by him, but I don’t think I’d ever be able to tell him that.
  • Well, I’m certainly infatuated with you and the way you talk to me.
  • I’m infatuated with all of the things he does for me, but I don’t have the stomach to tell him how I feel!

Fancy

“Fancy” is a common word we use when we want to show that we like someone more than a simple feeling, but we don’t “love” them. Usually, it means we want to get to know that person more to decide whether “love” might one day be on the table.

The definition of “fancy,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to start liking something or someone very much.”

These examples will help you make it work:

  • She told me that she fancies me, and I really don’t know how to take that!
  • I fancy you so much, and I think it’s about time that we gave each other a chance.
  • I can see why everyone fancies you, and I certainly agree with the masses!

Charmed

“Charmed” works well to show that we are pleased by someone’s actions. Often, it’s based on a certain “charming” quality that someone possesses. This quality isn’t usually enough for us to fall in “love,” but it’s definitely more than “like.”

The definition of “charmed,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “very pleased or attracted by someone’s charm.”

Here are some examples:

  • If I had to be honest, then I’m absolutely charmed by you.
  • I’m always so charmed by you, and I don’t know why you have such a profound effect on me.
  • I am so charmed by you. Thank you for being part of my life.

Care For

“Care for” works well when we want to show that we “care” about someone. It isn’t quite “love,” but it is much more than “like.” It works particularly well when referring to close friends or family members for this reason.

Here are a few ways we can get this one to make sense:

  • I really care for her, but I don’t think he cares much for me back. I need to apologize for what I did.
  • I truly care for you, and I’m sorry if I ever hurt your feelings. I’ll make sure never to let it happen again.
  • I care for you more than you probably realize. Without you in my life, I’d be totally lost!

Respect

“Respect” is another great way to show that you admire someone. Often, people earn our respect based on the actions they take and how they’ve impacted our lives. It’s a great way to show how much you like someone.

The definition of “respect,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “admiration felt or shown for someone or something that you believe has good ideas or qualities.”

These examples will help you make more sense of it:

  • I really respect each and every one of you. I want you to know that I’ll always be here when you need me to.
  • I respect you so much, and I can’t understand why you can’t find yourself a nice girl to make you happy!
  • I really do respect you. You’ve done so much for me, and it’s about time I repay the favor!

Appreciate

“Appreciate” works well as another word that implies we like someone a lot without loving them. It means that we recognize how important they are in our lives and that they’ve played an integral role in getting us to the places we are today.

The definition of “appreciate,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to recognize how good someone or something is and to value him, her, or it.”

Check out these examples to see how it works:

  • I must admit, I really do appreciate you. Without you around, I don’t know what might have happened to me.
  • I appreciate you and all the things you do for me. You’re a saint, and I couldn’t live without you.
  • I just want to say that I really appreciate you all as my closest group of friends!

Think The World Of

“Think the world of” works when you want to show that you think about someone a lot more than is typical if you simply “liked” them. However, it isn’t as strong as using “love,” and it can apply to some of your closest friends.

Often, this phrase works well when someone does a lot of kind things for you. If they’ve proved their friendships by the actions they’ve chosen to do for you, then you might “think the world of” them.

Here are some examples to help you with it:

  • I truly do think the world of you. Honestly, without you, I don’t even know where I’d be in my life right now.
  • I think the world of him! Without him, I’m sure that I would have gone insane, and that wouldn’t help anybody.
  • I think the world of you. I’m so thankful that you’re in my life, and I hope you never leave me!

Have A Soft Spot For

“Have a soft spot for” shows that we like someone a great deal. A “soft spot” means that we feel weak or are able to let our guard down toward someone (always in a positive light). It works well to show how much they mean to you.

There are plenty of ways we can use this phrase, as you’ll see from the following:

  • I truly have a soft spot for you, and I think I’m so blessed to have you in my life.
  • I have a soft spot for her, that’s for sure. I don’t think I’d ever be able to tell her that, though, without panicking first!
  • You have a soft spot for him, and it’s really obvious to everyone else. Maybe you should just tell him!