Weeks, Week’s or Weeks’: Here’s the difference + 30 examples

Rules here, agreements there, the English language is definitely a lot more complex than most people think, especially when you dive deeper into the technical aspects of its grammar. One grammar aspect one can get easily confused with is the use of ‘s, s’, and just s, especially when it comes to expressing time? So, is it week’s, weeks’ or weeks? Let’s find out!

Should I use Weeks or Week’s or Weeks’?

Actually, you can use all of them, just in different contexts.

“Weeks” should be used when you’re referring to the plural form of “week.” “Week’s” should be used when you’re using the singular possessive form of “week.” “Weeks'” should be used when you’re using the plural possessive form of “week.”

That’s all well and good, but what exactly does any of that mean? Well, it’s simple when you get right down to it. “Weeks” is simply the word you use when you’re referring to multiple weeks at the same time. “Week’s” is the word you use when you’re referring to a specific week having ownership of a particular object. “Weeks'” is used when you’re referring to multiple weeks owning the same object in a sentence.

If you’re still a bit confused, check out the examples we’ve got below for each word! Hopefully, that’ll clear some things up.

x
Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

10 examples of how to use “Weeks” in a sentence

  • Two weeks ago.
  • You’ll get your money sometime in the next few weeks.
  • I saw him three weeks ago and haven’t seen him since.
  • My puppy is eight weeks old today.
  • I’m starting my new job in exactly three weeks.
  • My appointment with the dentist is in five weeks. (This means that in five weeks, I will have to go to the dentist.)
  • It has been six weeks since Sheila last visited her parents’ house. (This means that the last time Sheila visited her parents was six weeks ago.)
  • I need to start applying for colleges in three weeks. (This means that college applications are going to start in three weeks.)
  • She decided to take a leave for the next two weeks. (This means that she will be on leave in the coming two weeks.)
  • May was really struggling during the last two weeks of school because of the heavy workload. (This means that the last two weeks of school were hard for May.)

As you can see, each example refers to multiple weeks at once, which makes it a plural form. However, none of these weeks mentioned are in the possessive form as they don’t “own” anything in the sentence. We’ll get to that next.

10 examples of how to use “Week’s” in a sentence

Let’s start with the simplest form. The plural of “week” is easy enough and probably the most common way you’ll be writing the word.

  • A week’s notice is needed before you resign.

“Notice” is the object owned by the “week.”

  • Last week’s paycheck hasn’t come through yet.

“Paycheck” is the object owned by the “week.”

  • Next week’s shifts look pretty tiring.

“Shifts” is the object owned by the “week.”

  • This week’s schedule is all over the place.

“Schedule” is the object owned by the “week.”

  • I’m going there in one week’s time.

“Time” is the object owned by the “week.”

Some other examples are:

  • This week’s talk is about gender equality and discrimination. (This means that the talk for this week is about gender equality and discrimination.)
  • Last week’s activity was about self love. (This means that the activity for last week was self love.)
  • Next week’s speakers will be from a different country. (This means that the speakers for next week would be foreigners.)
  • In my job, one week’s pay is equal to 20 dollars. (This means that the job pays 20 dollars for one week of work.)
  • This week’s mentors were better than the last one. (This means that the mentors for this week were better than the previous mentors.)

As you can see here, each of these examples only talks about one week. Whether it was “this week,” “last week,” “next week,” or “one week,” each form is still using the singular possessive.

10 examples of how to use “Weeks'” in a sentence

And finally, we’ll finish up by looking at the plural possessive. You should have a pretty good grasp of using it now, and we might not even need to include these examples for you! Nevertheless, we strive to ensure you’re getting the best information possible, so we still encourage you to read through these examples!

The first possessive form of “week” comes as the singular possessive form. We use this when one week “owns” a particular object in the sentence.

  • Two weeks’ notice is needed before you can leave.
  • He was docked four weeks’ pay!
  • Eight weeks’ free insurance isn’t something you can ignore.
  • She’s going there in three weeks’ time.
  • The last few weeks’ schedules have been all over the place.
  • I wasn’t able to receive my pay last week, so today I received two weeks’ pay. (This means that I received two weeks of pay because I didn’t receive any last week.)
  • The three weeks’ activity was super fun yet also super tiring. (This means that three weeks of activities were fun but tiring.)
  • She will be moving out of the country in two weeks’ time. (This means that she will be moving out of the country in two weeks of time.)
  • The four weeks’ warranty of the product was too short for me to buy it. (This means that the four weeks of  warranty that the product has was not long enough to make me buy the product.)
  • Since we’re in our busiest season, one day starts to feel like two weeks’ work. (This means that the busy season makes one day of work feel like two weeks of  work.)

We’ve tried to keep them similar to the singular possessive form so you can see how they differ. Basically, any time you’re talking about more than one week possessing an object in the sentence is when you’ll use “weeks’.” Remember, the objects in the sentences don’t have to be plural themselves. It’s just the “weeks” that do if there are multiple of them.

Quiz: Have you mastered Weeks, Week’s, or Weeks’?

Answer these questions to assess your learning, and check them using the answer key under the next heading.

  1. Two (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) left until I can quit.
  2. That’s three (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) pay down the drain.
  3. Last (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) leftovers are still in the fridge.
  4. The next few (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) are going to be so much fun.
  5. One (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) notice is required.
  6. Her vacation leave will last for two (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’).
  7. In six (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) time, she’ll be having a newborn baby.
  8. Next (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) lesson is said to be even harder than the lesson we had this week.
  9. I want to be in charge of this (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) activity.
  10. Her three (A. weeks / B. week’s / C. weeks’) allowance was gone because she spent it all on buying new clothes.

Quiz answers

  1. A
  2. C
  3. B
  4. A
  5. B
  6. A.
  7. C.
  8. B.
  9. B.
  10. C.