Put a Root on Someone – Meaning & Example Sentences

“Put a root on someone” is the sort of expression that, if you’re unfamiliar with it, could end up being extremely confusing. This article is going to explain what “put a root on someone means”, and use example sentences to make the explanation clearer.

Put a Root on Someone – Meaning

“Put a root on someone” is an expression that refers to the action of attempting to use supernatural ceremonies that involve ritual objects, specifically to attempt to cause harm to someone. It’s a very negative thing to do, as the outcome is supposed to involve bad things.

put a root on someone meaning

When you “put a root on someone”, you’re attempting to ensure that a specific bad thing happens to them, and you’re trying to conjure this bad thing into reality using mystical ceremonies.

It’s a very spiritual phrase that naturally involves certain religious beliefs, as not everyone is going to believe the idea that you can cause harm to someone through a ritual.

However, if you are a believer in these supernatural things, then to “put a root on someone” is a very powerful and negative thing to do, only to be done in the most extreme of scenarios.

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How to Use “Put a Root on Someone” in a Sentence

“Put a root on someone” is a very spiritual phrase that has to be used in some specific ways for it to make full sense. Here we have compiled a list of example sentences that will help you understand how to properly use “put a root on someone”:

  1. You put a root on her and then a few weeks later she was involved in a car accident, right?
  2. I am going to put a root on him, because I’m really upset about how things went down.
  3. I think someone is going to put a root on me, and I want to ensure that doesn’t happen.
  4. You can’t just put a root on someone because of a very minor thing, this is a very rash action.
  5. If you put a root on someone, you’ll be thinking about that action for the rest of your life.
  6. No matter what happens, I’ve decided I’m not going to put a root on someone.
  7. Put a root on someone and then see what happens and how you feel about it.

Put a Root on Someone – Origin

While we don’t exactly know who said “put a root on someone” first, we do know where it comes from. “Put a root on someone” comes from religious practices that originated in the Western parts of Africa, and through immigration have also obtained popularity in the USA and Caribbean.

Put a Root on Someone – Synonyms

The general idea of “putting a root on someone” is that you’re trying to get something bad to happen to them. Obviously, there are other ways that you can phrase this wish in the English language. Here are some synonym sentences that serve this purpose:

  • Cursing someone
  • Practicing witchcraft against someone
  • Casting a spell on someone
  • Spellcasting someone
  • Sending a curse to someone

Correct Ways to Say “Put a Root on Someone”

With a concept as popular and well-known as “putting a root on someone”, it stands to reason that there will be more than one way to phrase the idea. Here are some other correct ways in which you can say “put a root on someone”:

  • Rooting against someone
  • Give someone a root
  • Rooting for someone’s downfall

Incorrect Ways to Use “Put a Root on Someone”

The main incorrect way to use “put a root on someone” would be to use the phrase to refer to trying to use a spell in a positive way for someone. Simply put, “put a root on someone” is an expression that is used to get negative things to happen.

Therefore, it’s incorrect to use “put a root on someone” to talk about using a ritual or a ceremony to try to get something good to happen to a person.

In What Situations Can You Use “Put a Root on Someone”?

You “put a root on someone” when you want something bad to happen to them. Therefore, this is a phrase that is applied in situations where you’re trying to get something bad to happen to an enemy that you have.

Naturally, it’s a phrase that should be reserved for very high-stakes situations in which you really need something bad to happen to someone who means you harm and is, therefore, an enemy.