9 Polite Ways to Say “I Want to Go to the Toilet”

Asking to go to the toilet isn’t always easy. Some people worry about the appropriateness or politeness of announcing that you need to relieve yourself. Luckily, this article is here to help you. We’ve come up with some good polite alternatives you can use in any situation.

Polite Ways to Say I Want to Go to the Toilet

The preferred synonyms are “can I be excused,” “excuse me for a moment,” and “excuse me; I’ll be right back.” You don’t have to state that you are going to the toilet when you are trying to be polite. Even in formal situations, it’s better to avoid saying that entirely.

Can I Be Excused?

“Can I be excused?” is a great question for this situation. You can use it in any situation when you need to go to the toilet. It allows you to “excuse” yourself (whether you’re in a meeting, restaurant, on a date, etc.) and go to the toilet to do your business.

Notice how “toilet” or anything similar to that isn’t used in the question here. You do not need to be specific about why you have to be excused. Simply telling someone that you would like a moment to yourself is acceptable and polite.

  • Can I be excused briefly? There’s an urgent matter that I need to attend to.
  • Can I be excused? I’ll pick up all the things that I missed when I return.
  • Sorry, but can I be excused? I don’t have time to wait around right now. I won’t be long.
  • Can I be excused, please? I need to relieve myself while this is going on quickly.
  • I hate to do this in the middle of a meeting, but can I be excused?
Watch the video: Only 1 percent of ...
Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

Excuse Me For A Moment

“Excuse me for a moment” is a great statement you can use when you have already started making your way toward the toilet. You can use this to be polite when you are exiting a room.

Again, “toilet” is not mentioned here. While it is heavily implied when you use the phrase, you do not have to mention it. If you’d rather keep that part private, you don’t have to worry about saying anything about it.

  • Excuse me for a moment. There’s something urgent that I must do.
  • Excuse me for a moment. I won’t be long, so you can continue the meeting without me.
  • Excuse me for a moment. I must have forgotten to relieve myself earlier.
  • Excuse me for a moment. I won’t be long. I’m very sorry about the inconvenience.
  • Excuse me for a moment, please. I hope you will continue talking while I’m away.

Excuse Me; I’ll Be Right Back

“Excuse me; I’ll be right back” is another good choice that avoids using “toilet” in any way. It simply shows the people you’re with that you need some time to yourself.

The “toilet” break is implied through the context. You also can go on to elaborate as to where you’re going if you need to. There are no rules that say you can’t mention “toilet,” but it is tactful to avoid doing so in most cases.

  • Excuse me; I’ll be right back. Continue without me in the meantime. I’ll catch up.
  • Excuse me; I’ll be right back. I’ve got a few things to sort out.
  • Excuse me; I’ll be right back. I have to pop to the toilet before we continue.
  • Excuse me; I’ll be right back. Nature calls, after all.
  • Excuse me; I’ll be right back. I don’t mind if you continue talking without me.

I’ll Be Back In A Minute

“I’ll be back in a minute” is another great one. It shows that you only need a few moments to fix yourself up and go to the toilet. It works best when you know you’ll be in and out of the toilet and back before anyone notices.

This works well in formal and informal situations. You won’t need to tell anyone where you’re going, even if it’s made fairly clear from your actions or contextual clues.

  • I’ll be back in a minute. Please, continue the discussions in my absence. I don’t mind.
  • I’ll be back in a minute. I won’t be too long. You can continue for now.
  • I’ll be back in a minute. I’m very sorry if this has come as an inconvenience to you.
  • I’ll be back in a minute. I don’t know what’s come over me right now.
  • I’ll be back in a minute. I hope you don’t mind if I pop out for a little while.

I Would Like To Use The Bathroom

“I would like to use the bathroom” is the first statement you can use that mentions your intentions. It shows that you need to go to the toilet, and you would like the chance to do that without anyone judging you.

This announcement works well as a polite way to excuse yourself. You don’t have to ask for any permission with this. You simply have to say it and make your way out.

  • I would like to use the bathroom. I appreciate that we’re in the middle of something, but this can’t wait.
  • I would like to use the bathroom. I know it’s bad timing, but I really have to go.
  • I would like to use the bathroom. I won’t be long. If you want to continue without me, you can.
  • I would like to use the bathroom. It shouldn’t take long. I’ll catch up with the notes when I’m back.
  • I would like to use the bathroom. I hope that’s not too forward.

I Have To Go To The Bathroom

“I have to go to the bathroom” is another good choice. Again, you don’t need to wait for anybody to give you permission. This time, you can use this phrase to show that you’re already making your way to the bathroom (or “toilet”).

“Bathroom” doesn’t have to be used here. You can use any name for a “toilet” that you think works best in your situation.

  • I have to go to the bathroom, so I’m going to excuse myself. I’m very sorry about this.
  • I have to go to the bathroom. Is everyone okay if I do that?
  • I have to go to the bathroom. I can’t hold it any longer! I must go quickly.
  • I have to go to the bathroom. Do you mind if I excuse myself for the time being?
  • I have to go to the bathroom. I hope that’s not inappropriate to say right now.

I’m Going To The Toilet

“I’m going to the toilet” is an announcement you can make that works well. It remains polite and formal, but it also makes sure that everyone knows what your plan is or why you are choosing to leave when you are.

  • I’m going to the toilet. I need to relieve myself, and I can’t think of a better time to do it.
  • I’m going to the toilet. Sorry if that’s too much information. I’ll be right back.
  • I’m going to the toilet. I won’t be too long, but you can carry on without me here.
  • I’m going to the toilet. Let me know if there’s anything important that I miss while I’m away.
  • I’m going to the toilet. I’ll see you in a few minutes if that’s okay.

I’ll Be Right Back

“I’ll be right back” is a decent choice, though it’s not always the best one in formal English. It doesn’t always imply that you are going to the toilet, so some people might choose to question you further as to where you’re going.

If you don’t mind answering questions with “I’m going to the toilet,” this phrase works fine. The only reason it’s not as popular as the other statements that avoid using “toilet” in them is that the toilet situation isn’t easily implied through the context of this statement.

  • I’ll be right back. There’s an urgent matter I need to attend to.
  • I’ll be right back. Don’t worry about waiting for me. I’ll catch up when I return.
  • I’ll be right back. I hope you don’t mind if I excuse myself for a moment.
  • I’ll be right back. Sorry if that’s thrown a spanner in the works for you.
  • I’ll be right back. I have to leave the meeting for a brief moment.

Apologies, But I Have To Be Excused

“Apologies, but I have to be excused” is a great formal choice you can use. “Apologies” starts the sentence here, showing that it’s regrettable, but you have to leave. “I have to be excused” also indicates that you have to leave.

You don’t need to mention anything about where you’re going after this one. Most people will likely know, but you don’t have to say it. It’s good to avoid mentioning it sometimes, especially for proud people.

  • Apologies, but I have to be excused. I’ll return as quickly as I am able.
  • Apologies, but I have to be excused. I need to do a few things that can’t wait.
  • Apologies, but I have to be excused. I hope you’ll continue these talks in my absence.
  • Apologies, but I have to be excused. I’m very sorry for any inconvenience this might cause.
  • Apologies, but I have to be excused. I won’t be too long. Just continue without me.