12 Best Words For Someone Who Gives Back To The Community

It’s always great if someone is able to give back to the community whenever they can. Naturally, these kinds of people are very caring about those around them, and it might help to know of some good synonyms we can use to talk about them and their deeds.

What Do You Call Someone Who Gives Back To The Community?

There are many great options available to us. Why not give one of the following a try:

  • Philanthropist
  • Altruistic
  • Selfless
  • Charitable
  • Giver
  • Donor
  • Beneficent
  • Benefactor
  • Munificent
  • Generous
  • Sponsor
  • Pay it forward
Best Words For Someone Who Gives Back To The Community

The preferred version is “philanthropist.” It works well to show that someone who gives back to the community is charitable and loves to give. Often, the things they “give back” to the community are contributions that will better the lives of those around them.

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Philanthropist

“Philanthropist” works when someone is willing to give back to their community. They will often make sizeable monetary donations or give other things like time, skills, or services if they are required.

The definition of “philanthropist,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a person who helps the poor, especially by giving them money.”

Here are some examples to help you:

  • Jonny is the biggest philanthropist of the lot. I admire him.
  • You’re not quite the philanthropist you think you are. Though, I’m sure the community thanks you.
  • Stop being such a philanthropist! You probably need to save some of that money!

Altruistic

“Altruistic” works to describe someone who is always willing to help out. They will even choose to help their community if it were to put them at a disadvantage (i.e. paying more money than they can afford so they can help others).

The definition of “altruistic,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “showing a wish to help or bring advantages to others, even if it results in disadvantage for yourself.”

Check out these examples to see how it works:

  • You’re more altruistic than me. I don’t think I could make those sacrifices!
  • You shouldn’t sell yourself short. Be as altruistic as you want to be, my good sir!
  • I think she’s altruistic enough to get on some kind of star list! We should reward her for her work!

Selfless

“Selfless” is a great adjective we can use to show that someone is willing to give to the community. They will often do this out of the kindness of their own hearts and usually do not need to be asked for aid by the community.

The definition of “selfless,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “caring more for what other people need and want rather than for what you yourself need and want.”

These examples will help you to figure it out:

  • Sharon is more selfless than any of the rest of you. You should learn something from her.
  • I think you’re incredibly selfless. No one else will be willing to give back the things that you do.
  • Stop being so humble! You’re the most selfless person I’ve ever met!

Charitable

“Charitable” works well to show that someone is always giving where they can. They could put things like money, food, or services into their community. As long as the community needs something, a charitable person will deliver.

The definition of “charitable,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “giving money, food, or help free to those who are in need because they are ill, poor, or have no home.”

Check out some of these examples to help you:

  • She isn’t nearly as charitable as she used to be. Still, we’re thankful for her.
  • You’re very charitable, and this community can do nothing more than thank you for everything you’ve done.
  • Thank you for being so charitable, Mr. Harrison!

Giver

“Giver” means that someone is willing to give things to their community. They could give money or services, depending on what they are best suited toward.

The definition of “giver,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a person who gives something to someone.”

Check out these examples to help you:

  • I’m somewhat of a giver myself. I’ll always put my community first.
  • Sarah is the best giver we’ve had in generations! We can’t lose her now.
  • I need to find someone who is generous enough to be the next community giver!

Donor

“Donor” works when someone is happy to “donate” to their community. It could be money, services, or something else entirely. As long as they give something, they are a “donor.”

The definition of “donor,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a person who gives money or something else of value to an organization.”

These examples should help you with it:

  • I’d like to be a community donor if you’ll have me.
  • He’s the community donor, and we couldn’t thank him enough for what he’s done.
  • You should become a donor for this event! They’ll love you for it.

Beneficent

“Beneficent” works when we want to show that someone is happy helping others. They will often do good things for their community, and will always make sure to give wherever they can.

The definition of “beneficent,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “helping people and doing good acts.”

Here are a few examples that might help you:

  • I would love to be more beneficent wherever I can be. It’s time that I helped my community as it once helped me.
  • She is one of the most beneficent celebrities I’ve ever met. She’s so selfless!
  • You’re far too beneficent for your own good! You amaze me every day with the things you do!

Benefactor

“Benefactor” is a great word that shows someone is willing to give money to their community. They do this to help set up schemes and projects that will better the lives of those around them.

The definition of “benefactor,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “someone who gives money to help an organization, society, or person.”

Here are a couple of examples to help you:

  • I’m a benefactor of my local community. You can ask me anything you need to know about it.
  • He’s the benefactor of these parts. We certainly have a lot to thank him for.
  • I’d love to be a benefactor, but I need to make sure I can save enough money first!

Munificent

“Munificent” works to show that someone is always generous with their money. Usually, this word is reserved for those who make a great deal of money and don’t mind if a little portion of their overall income gets spent on other things.

The definition of “munificent,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “very generous with money.”

These examples should help you with it:

  • Thomas is munificent for this community. Without his input, nothing would ever get done.
  • We need munificent helpers! Do you think you could find anyone who is happy to help with these projects?
  • I’m not nearly as munificent as people seem to think I am. However, I’ll take the credit where I can!

Generous

“Generous” is a simple adjective we can use to show that someone is happy to give their money to others. They will mainly find people who they understand need the money more than they do and give it to them to assist them with something.

The definition of “generous,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “willing to give money, help, kindness, etc., especially more than is usual or expected.”

These examples should help you to understand it:

  • I’m very generous when it counts. I always make sure to help out with all the little community projects around here.
  • You’re quite the generous soul! I wish I had your spirit and ability to treat others with that much kindness.
  • I wish I had the money to be more generous! Then I’d happily give away my wealth wherever possible!

“Sponsor” works well to show that someone is willing to pay toward something. They will often use their money to help set up local projects or programs. Often, these programs will assist the less fortunate in their community.

The definition of “sponsor,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “to pay for someone to do something or for something to happen.

These examples might help you understand it better:

  • I think that Jack makes a great sponsor for this community. It’s why so many people accept him.
  • You should become a community sponsor. I’m sure there are plenty of people out there who could make use of your wealth!
  • Don’t just be a sponsor because you can. Be one because you know that it makes you happy, and it helps the community too.

Pay It Forward

“Pay it forward” works as an idiom. It works to show that someone is always looking to “pay” their happiness and earnings “forward.” Generally, if someone has given you something, you should “pay it forward” and give it to someone else when you can.

These examples will help you make a little more sense of it:

  • I really think you should go out there and pay it forward. You’ll be amazed at how much happiness it’ll bring you.
  • Remember my mantra: always pay it forward. There is so much you can get out of cheering up your community.
  • Pay it forward, please. I don’t want my money to go toward nothing! I want it to be worth something.