12 Good Synonyms For “Skills” On Your Resumé

We all know that talking about our skills is important. We need to make sure our potential employers see us as skilled workers as it’s what makes us the most hirable candidate. This article will explore some other options you can use to replace “skills.”

Good Synonyms For Skills On Your Resumé

The preferred synonyms are “expertise” or “knowledge.” They both work well to show that you have many skills. Often, these skills have been picked up over time (during your previous employment opportunities). It’s great to include in your resumé to show what you know.

Expertise

“Expertise” works well because it shows that you’ve spent a lot of time learning about things. If you have become an “expert” in business, it means you put a lot of faith into your knowledge and skills (and potential employers should too).

The definition of “expertise,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a high level of knowledge or skill.”

  • I have a lot of expertise in these fields. I think it’s important for you to give me a chance to see what I can do.
  • Of course, I’m happy to bring my expertise into this business. I think there’s a lot that you can all learn from me.
  • My expertise was unchallenged at my previous place of employment. That’s why I thought it was time for a change.
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Knowledge

“Knowledge” is a simple synonym we can use. It shows that we know a lot of things, and we usually pick up that knowledge from things related to our previous workplaces.

The definition of “knowledge,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “understanding of or information about a subject that you get by experience or study, either known by one person or by people generally.”

  • I have a lot of knowledge that I’m keen to share. I’d love a chance to host a few meetings about this.
  • My knowledge makes it quite easy for me to find a new job. I think it’s time I applied myself.
  • I would like to share knowledge that I’ve picked up from years of service in various companies related to this field.

Experience

“Experience” is one of the most popular choices when writing a resumé. It works because many employers look for “experience” amongst the people that have applied for the position.

The definition of “experience,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “(the process of getting) knowledge or skill from doing, seeing, or feeling things.”

  • I have plenty of experience to talk about. If you would like to offer me an interview, I’d be happy to share it with you.
  • My experience was unrivaled from before. I think it’s worth hiring me for that alone.
  • I’m going to share my experiences with everyone to help them understand how to do their jobs a little better.

Mastery

“Mastery” only works if you believe yourself to be a “master” of the field you’re talking about. You usually have a lot of practice and skills related to a certain situation, and mastery is a really positive way to demonstrate this.

The definition of “mastery,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “great skill in a particular job or activity.”

  • My mastery in this field makes it easier for me to fall into any position related to it.
  • I have plenty of mastery to talk about with these projects. I’d be happy to share how I managed it.
  • There are many things I would consider myself a master in. I’m happy to talk about them at great lengths if that’s okay.

Abilities

“Abilities” works as an alternative to “skills.” The two words are nearly identical in meaning, but “abilities” can refer to physical or mental attributes that might give someone an edge in certain business aspects.

The definition of “abilities,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “the physical or mental power or skill needed to do something.”

  • The abilities I possess make my life a lot easier. I have ways to make my workload as effective as possible.
  • I would like to share my abilities with you. I think you’ll be interested to hear about a few of the ideas I have.
  • I’m going to have a few abilities read out to you. Let me know which ones you think apply the most to the current situation.

Aptitude

“Aptitude” is a great word to talk about your natural ability to do something. It works well in business contexts because it shows that you know a lot without having to worry too much about learning from other people.

The definition of “aptitude,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a natural ability or skill.”

  • My aptitudes are what got me through college. I’m now more than happy to share them with the working world.
  • I have an aptitude for business statistics in this field. I won’t let you down if you give me a chance to prove myself.
  • My aptitude for the arts is what makes me so ideal for a creative job such as this.

Competence

“Competence” is another great choice in business formats. Employers are always looking for competent workers, so it makes sense that you should use this word when you’re trying to show what you can do.

The definition of “competence,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “the ability to do something well.”

  • I’ve been known to have a great deal of competence when it counts. I think you should consider me as a candidate.
  • My competency was unmatched at my previous place of employment. I want to find somewhere that challenges me.
  • I have a lot of competence in these matters. I think it’s important to start exploring them before it’s too late.

Adeptness

“Being “adept” means that you have a natural ability for something. “Adeptness” is just a way to talk about the skills or abilities you already have.

The definition of “adeptness,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “having a natural ability to do something that needs skill.”

  • I’d like to think that my adeptness is what got me through the tuition. Now, I’m happy to share how I did it.
  • I have some adeptnesses that I think will be worth your while. I’ll make sure to perform to the best of my abilities.
  • I consider myself adept in these three fields. They are all particularly important to the kind of job you’re offering.

Flair

“Flair” is an interesting choice. It adds a lot of character to a resumé if you can use this one correctly. That’s why we think it works well, as it’s not often that an employer will see “flair” used.

The definition of “flair,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “a natural ability to do something well.”

  • I’m sure that my flair is going to be a big help around the office. I have a lot of skills to share around.
  • I have a natural flair for these things. I’ll be happy to share my zealousness with those that work close to me.
  • My flair is what keeps me going. I think you’ll be very impressed with the things I’m able to do.

Talents

“Talents” shows that you have a lot of skills related to certain subjects. You can relate it to the things that you are most proficient with, which are often the things that will impress a potential employer the most.

The definition of “talents,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “(someone who has) a natural ability to be good at something, especially without being taught.”

  • The talents I possess are what make me an ideal candidate. I think you should consider me for this post.
  • I have plenty of talents to share with the world. If you hire me, it’ll give me a chance to show them off.
  • I have a few talents that might be beneficial in this job role.

Readiness

“Readiness” is more specific than the other choices. It works well, but only when you’re talking about your ability to be willing to do something on the fly. If something gets changed, you can use this to show you are adaptable, which is a great skill to have.

The definition of “readiness,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “willingness or a state of being prepared for something.”

  • I have plenty of readiness for the problems that you’re facing. I know how to handle myself well.
  • The readiness I possess is what helps me the most. I think I’m worth the hire for that alone.
  • You’ll see that my readiness is unmatched. I have a great mind for fixing these problems.

Know-How

“Know-how” is similar to knowledge. We use it to show that we “know how” something is going to work. It’s a suitable choice formally because it shows that we are capable of figuring things out for ourselves.

The definition of “know-how,” according to The Cambridge Dictionary, is “practical knowledge and ability.”

  • As long as I have the know-how, I’ll be happy to share it with the others.
  • My know-how comes from a history of great jobs. I want to share what I’ve got with the rest of you.
  • There are plenty of things that my know-how allows me to get right. Just give me a chance to prove that.

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