4 Formal Alternatives To “I Would Like To Know”

The phrase “I would like to know” is already a classic and simple choice when you want to be formal in writing. However, you might want to try out an alternative that could work in different situations. This article will explore the best synonyms for the phrase.

Which Formal Alternatives Can I Use Instead Of “I Would Like To Know”?

There are a few good formal alternatives that you might want to use in place of “I would like to know.” Some of the best ones include:

  • I would like to enquire
  • I would like further information
  • I would like to discuss
  • I would like to investigate
Which Formal Alternatives Can I Use Instead Of "I Would Like To Know"?

The preferred version is “I would like to enquire” because it has the closest matching meaning to the original idea of “I would like to know.” We can use it to ask for more information about a certain thing, and it is most appropriate to use in a business email format.

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I Would Like To Enquire

We’ll start with the best possible option. It works really well in emails regarding many different subject matters, which is why we think it’s appropriate to start with.

“I would like to enquire” works well when we’re looking for further information on a subject matter. We use “enquire” as the infinitive verb here to ask whether we can learn more information about something.

While “I would like to know” is already formal, including “enquire” over “know” is a great way to show your superiors that you mean business, and it shows that you’re capable of speaking with a polite and formal tone.

You may also use it as a superior when you’re talking to someone in your team or an employee. It’s simply a way that we can show somebody that we’re interested in learning more information about something, while also maintaining a formal and polite tone.

You might see “I would like to enquire” in the following ways:

  • I would like to enquire about what you sell here so that I know whether you’re worth investing in.
  • I would like to enquire for more information because I don’t think you’ve written it all down here.
  • I would like to enquire about why you’re here if you’d be so kind as to tell me.

We’ll also include an email example to show you how it might look:

  • Dear sir,
  • I would like to enquire about a possible raise to my salary.
  • Of course, I understand if you’re too busy now, but I’d appreciate it if we could schedule a meeting for another time.
  • Kind regards,
  • John Senior

I Would Like Further Information

The next synonym is “I would like further information,” which works much to the same degree. It’s another great choice, but some people think it’s too wordy to put higher than “enquire.”

“I would like further information” is a great way to state what you want without needing any extra verbs. We use “further information” to ask for exactly that – more developments or ideas that are related to the thing in question.

While most native speakers understand verbs like “know” and “enquire,” “further information” is a great alternative for those who might not have as strong of a grasp of the English language.

We can use it when we want to show exactly what we’re asking for rather than allowing our email or message to be left up to interpretation if someone doesn’t understand what we’re “enquiring” about.

You might see “I would like further information” as follows:

  • Hello, I would like further information on what you’re selling here if you’d indulge me with that.
  • I would like further information, though I’m not sure if you’re in a position to provide it.
  • If it’s okay with you, I would like further information before I make any final decisions.

In a business email, you might see it as follows:

  • Dear ma’am,
  • I would like further information regarding the recent rule changes to staff attire.
  • I appreciate that you’re a busy woman, but I have a few points that I’d like to discuss with you.
  • Thank you for your time,
  • Misty Waters

I Would Like To Discuss

“I would like to discuss” is great when you want to set up a way to discuss a matter with somebody else (sometimes more than one person).

We can use “I would like to discuss” when we want to set up a meeting to find out more information about something. This is a really good and formal way to set up a time and date to discuss something, especially if the information relates to you or someone on your team.

When we “discuss” with somebody in this manner, it’s clear that we’re looking for answers to a question or a report of some kind. Usually, the person that we ask to have a discussion with will come with plenty of information that they can share with us.

It’s best to use this phrase when you’re speaking to a staff member if you want to set up a performance meeting. You might also use it when you’re emailing a boss, but only when there’s something bothering you that you think they may be able to help you with.

“I would like to discuss” works well in the following ways:

  • I would like to discuss the matter further with you if you have the time to spare.
  • I would like to discuss this further, and I’m sure you’ll be more than happy to provide me with what I need to know.
  • I would like to discuss this with you, but I’m afraid I’m too busy at the minute!

In a business email, “I would like to discuss” works like so:

  • Dear Charles Head,
  • I would like to discuss the matters with you further, but I’m afraid I’m out of the office until next week.
  • If you could raise the issue with my stand-in until then, that would be great.
  • Thank you,
  • Mr. Smith

I Would Like To Investigate

Finally, let’s look at “I would like to investigate.” It’s the least likely synonym to use because it only works in certain situations, but we included it because it can work really well when you find the right context.

“I would like to investigate” is a formal phrase that we use when announcing that we’ll be investigating or evaluating something that has happened in the workplace. Usually, this is something that a manager or supervisor will do for their team members.

It’s best to use “I would like to investigate” when you’re talking to somebody above you about someone on your team. Generally, it’ll be brought to your attention that someone’s performance has dipped or that something has gone wrong during work hours.

Once this has been made clear, you might use “I would like to investigate” to show your boss that you’re enthusiastic and ready to deal with the situation accordingly. Sometimes, it doesn’t amount to much, but you won’t know that until you conclude investigations.

While not the best choice in all situations, you might see “I would like to investigate” in the following ways:

  • I would like to investigate my findings further with you. Do you think you have the time to accommodate that?
  • We would like to investigate this together, and we need you to sign off on our new proposal.
  • I would like to investigate the happenings of the previous meeting. Do you think we could discuss it?

Again, it’s not the best choice always, but certain business emails might benefit from the phrase. We can use it as follows:

  • Dear Mr. Smith,
  • I would like to investigate the issue you raised about his behavior further.
  • I appreciate that his performance has dipped in recent months, and I’ll make sure to keep you updated with what I find out.
  • Kind regards,
  • Sharon Osborn

Is “I Would Like To Know” Informal?

We’ve included some excellent examples and synonyms above, but we haven’t touched on “I would like to know” as a phrase yet. Is it informal or can we use it in a business format?

“I would like to know” is a formal phrase, which we can use in any formal situation like a business email. There is nothing wrong with the phrase, though some people believe it’s overused.

Typically, you’ll use “I would like to know” when you want to learn more information about something, just like all of the synonyms we included in the section above.

It will help you to understand how “I would like to know” looks in examples, so we’ll include some extras before we end the article:

  • I would like to know more about this. If you could send me over all the relevant details, I’ll be happy to take a closer look.
  • I would like to know what you’ve got here, and I would appreciate it if you could keep me involved with future proceedings.
  • I would like to know all about it. If you have the time, maybe we can set up a meeting to talk about your ideas.