Days or Day’s or Days’? Here’s the difference + 15 examples

Even though the English language is the most spoken all over the globe, it remains to be one of the most challenging languages to learn. Moreover, considering that language constantly changes to adapt to the need of its speakers, some grammatical rules are misunderstood not only by non-native speakers but even native speakers. In fact, there are some words in the English language that can easily mean differently with just a single letter, punctuation, or even a mere space. For example, one of the most commonly misunderstood words in the language is time expressions. Have you e.g. wondered, if it is day’s or days’ notice and if it it days end or day’s end? In this article, you will learn more about the days or day’s grammar.

It is critical for a first language, second language, and foreign-language speakers of the English language to understand the differences between day’s, days’, and days. In this article, we will be talking about how each variation differs from the other.

Is it Days or Day’s or Days’?

Days, Day’s and Days’ are entirely different. The location of the apostrophe makes the meaning of these words different although they use the same letters. Days are used when referring to a number of days. Day’s is used as a noun, particularly when referring to a day’s work or a day’s duty. Days’ are utilized to express the possessive form of something and basically the plural of Day’s.

For example, “I am sending a one day’s notice or a one days’ notice to the entire team before I make a final decision.” In this sentence, we need to focus on the word “one.” Since we are talking about a particular day, the correct sentence would be to use the word “day’s.” Thus, when you write your announcement, you would have to say, “I am sending a one day’s notice to the entire team before I make a final decision.”

On the other hand, if you are planning to write a business letter with the sentence, “I am writing this letter to serve as my 10 day’s notice or 10 days’ notice for my leave of absence.” Again, you need to focus on the number “10”. Since the number 10 signifies more than one day, the correct sentence for your letter would be, “I am writing this letter to serve as my 10 days’ notice for my leave of absence.”

The word “days” signifies more than one day, for it is the plural of the word day. On the other hand, the word “day’s” is the possessive form of the word.

If you wish to use the plural form of the day without the apostrophe, use days. For example, “There are a total of 365 days in a single year.” You can also say, “There are additional days for my school break.” On the contrary, you use an apostrophe which will be followed by “s” when you wish to refer to a singular measure of time such as “a day’s notice.”

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5 examples of how to use “Days” in a sentence

  • If a loan is 90 days past its due, it is subject to foreclosure.
  • How many days are there in a week?
  • She has been absent for three days.
  • There are no more days left for her leave.
  • How do you plan your days?

5 examples of how to use “Day’s” in a sentence

  • He finished a whole day’s worth of work in 6 hours.
  • He received a day’s pay.
  • The following day’s market value of the issued funds, including the outstanding shares and even the shareholder’s investment, will not be influenced by the reverse split.
  • You are in charge of the next day’s tasks.
  • It was his last day’s request.

5 examples of how to use “Days'” in a sentence

  • Once the lender provides their 30 days’ notice, the borrower will default if the borrower does not give the full payment.
  • She received her 90 days’ compensation.
  • These days’ gossips are too much for her mental health.
  • Her last days’ wishes were fulfilled.

Summary

The plural form of day is “days.” Thus, the word days can be used like, “There are seven days in a week.” On the other hand, when there is an added apostrophe and “s” to the word day, it refers to the possessive form of the inanimate word day. Therefore, “day’s” can be used like, “Please be reminded that this is your one day’s notice before the foreclosure of your account.” Now, if you are talking about more than a singular unit of time, you need to place the apostrophe after the plural form of the word “day.” For example, “This is your 30 days’ notice before you request is forfeited.”

Have you mastered Day’s, Days, or Days’?

Correct answers can be seen under the next heading

  1. She’s been absent for two (a. Day’s, b. Days, c. Days’)
  2. His boss handed him his 60 (a. Day’s, b. Days, c. Days’) notice yesterday.
  3. Just give him his next (a. Day’s, b. Days, c.Days’) tasks.
  4. How many work (a. Day’s, b. Days, c. Days’) do you have in a month?
  5. It’s my all in a (Day’s, b. Days, c. Days’) work.

Answers to the quiz on Day’s, Days, or Days’

  1. B
  2. C
  3. A
  4. B
  5. A