Ponies or Pony’s or Ponies’? (Correct Possessive Explained)

Unlike most words, “pony” doesn’t have the usual pluralized form. Because of this, it’s important to understand how to properly use the plural form. Also, you should note how the possessive is used in singular and plural form. This article aims to help anyone in need of a clearer understanding.

Ponies, Pony’s or Ponies’?: Which is the Correct Possessive Form?

From the singular word “pony”, we get the correct pluralized form “ponies”. We then have the singular possessive form, “pony’s”, and lastly, we have the plural possessive form, “ponies'”. It’s worth noting that no other forms or spelling of these words are correct.

Ponies, Pony's or Ponies': Which is the Correct Possessive Form?
SingularPony
PluralPonies
Singular possessivePony’s
Plural possessivePonies’

As you can see the word, “pony”, isn’t pluralized in the usual way. Generally, to pluralize a word, we merely add on an “S” at the end. However, with “pony” to pluralize the word, we must drop the “Y” and add an “IES”.

On the other hand, the possessive forms do follow the usual rule. For the singular possessive form, we add the expected apostrophe and “S” to “pony”. For the plural possessive, we take the plural form of “ponies” and add an apostrophe at the end.

Ponies

“Ponies”, being the plural form of “pony”, is used to describe more than one pony. We use this word any time we are speaking generally about any number of “ponies” that exceeds one. We do not use this form when possessively speaking, even of multiple ponies.

As mentioned, to write the plural form of “pony”, we follow the usual rule of dropping the “Y” and adding an “IES”. We do this because in the English language when a word has a vowel before the “Y”, you add the letter “S” to pluralize. However, when the word has a consonant before the “Y”, we remove said “Y”, and replace it with “IES”.

Here are a few examples of words with vowels before the “Y”. With these words, we simply add an “S” on the end to pluralize.

  • Key = Keys
  • Annoy = Annoys
  • Delay = Delays
  • Day = Days

Now, here are examples with consonants prior to the “Y”. With these words, we remove the “Y” and replace it with “IES” to pluralize.

  • Pony = Ponies
  • Company = Companies
  • Quality = Qualities
  • Kitty = Kitties

As you can see, since “pony” has a consonant (“N”) before the “Y”, it follows suit with the English language rule, dropping the “Y” and adding the “IES”.

It’s now important to go over some examples of sentences correctly and incorrectly using “ponies”.

  • Correct: “Our ponies love living within this large pasture.”
  • Correct: “Your ponies are so beautiful, with each having a unique personality!”
  • Incorrect: “Your ponies mane is beautiful! What shampoo do you use on her?”
  • Incorrect: “Your ponies food bins are all almost empty.”

As shown in the correct examples, both sentences are speaking about more than one pony. Therefore, using the word “ponies” is proper in both sentences.

In the incorrect examples, we see the plural form “ponies” used, when a possessive form should have been used instead. The first example should have included the form “pony’s”, while the second should include “ponies'”.

Pony’s

“Pony’s”, being the singular possessive form of “pony”, is used to describe the belongings, body parts, mood, etc. of a singular pony. We only use this form when speaking in terms of a singular pony, never multiple, as that would be incorrect.

When writing the singular possessive form of “pony”, we add an apostrophe and “S” at the end. This is another generalized rule in the English language and is used whether the singular noun ends in an “S” or not. Singular possessive nouns refer to one person, place, or thing, with an ownership or specific connection to another element within the sentence.

We’ll now go over some examples sentences using the word “pony’s”, both correctly and incorrectly.

  • Correct: “My pony’s mane is getting so long.”
  • Correct: “My pony’s food basket is empty.”
  • Incorrect: “Our pony’s manes are both getting very long.”
  • Incorrect: “Both of our pony’s food bins need to be refilled.”

As shown in the correct examples, the apostrophe and “S” is added to the end of “pony” to show the singular possessive form – as they are speaking of one pony.

The incorrect examples highlight when the singular possessive form has been used to describe more than one pony. These sentences would have been correct, had the proper plural possessive form of “ponies'”, been used.

Ponies’

“Ponies'”, being the plural possessive form of “pony”, is used to describe the body parts, ownership, emotions, etc. of more than one pony. We only use this form when speaking in terms of multiple ponies. Using this form to depict a single pony’s possessions would be incorrect.

When we then write the plural possessive form of “pony”, we’re building off of the plural form, “ponies”. In the English language, we build singular possessives from the singular form of a word and plural possessives from the plural form of a word. When a pluralized form of a word ends in an “S”, by the rule of the English language, we add an apostrophe on the end.

Now, here’s a few examples of how to correctly and incorrectly use “ponies'”, in a sentence.

  • Correct: “Your ponies’ manes are all so thick and healthy.”
  • Correct: “We need to clean the ponies’ food bins because the storm made them filthy.”
  • Incorrect: “The ponies’ are out in the pasture, grazing.”
  • Incorrect: “Your ponies’ saddle isn’t on correctly,”

The correct examples are properly using the plural possessive form, “ponies'”. Each sentence is describing either the ownership or body parts of multiple “ponies”, making the apostrophe necessary.

The first incorrect example showcases when the plural form “ponies” should have been utilized instead. There is no possession, merely a statement involving the whereabouts of more than one pony.

The second incorrect example shows when the singular possessive form should have been utilized instead. In this sentence, someone is speaking about the saddle of a single pony. Therefore, the sentence should have included the singular possessive form of “pony’s”.

Quiz: Have You Mastered Ponies or Pony’s or Ponies’?

Now that you’ve gone through the content of this article, it’s time for a little quiz. The answers will be made available after this section, so you’ll be able to see how you’ve done.

  1. The (A. ponies / B. pony’s / C. ponies’) got out of the pasture!
  2. My (A. ponies / B. pony’s / C. ponies’) mane is getting very long.
  3. Our (A. ponies / B. pony’s / C. ponies’) love to graze in the pasture.
  4. Your (A. ponies / B. pony’s / C. ponies’) manes are all so gorgeous.
  5. My (A. ponies / B. pony’s / C. ponies’) stalls all need to be properly cleaned.

Quiz Answers

  1. A.
  2. B.
  3. A.
  4. C.
  5. C.

Final Thoughts

When wanting to use the correct pluralized form of “pony”, you will use the word “ponies”. If you’re speaking of the body parts, possessions, etc. of a singular “pony”, then you will use “pony’s”. If you’re speaking of the possessions of multiple “ponies”, then you’ll use “ponies'”.

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