Hoped or Hopped – Which Spelling Is Correct? (Examples)

Are “Hoped” and “Hopped” synonyms? Those words are quite similar, and some people may think they are just alternate spellings of the same word. But are they?

We want to know what “Hoped” and “Hopped” mean, which form to avoid and how to properly use those words.

Hoped or Hopped – Which Spelling Is Correct?

“Hoped” and “Hopped” are correct, but have different meanings. “Hoped” is the past tense of “Hope”, which means to want something to happen or be true. “Hopped” is the past tense of “Hop”, which means jump on one foot. You can use both, as long as you use them properly.

hoped or hopped

Take a look at the examples:

  • We all hoped everything would turn out okay.
  • We all hopped everything would turn out okay. (incorrect)
  • Everyone was shocked that Paul hopped the fence and left.
  • Everyone was shocked that Paul hoped the fence and left. (incorrect)

Each set of examples presents one word and its correct meaning.

In the first set of sentences, a group of people shares the hope that things would be ok. The people “Hoped” it would turn out fine. In this scenario, it makes no sense to talk about jumping around and, consequently, “Hopped” wouldn’t fit in this sentence.

In the second set, however, Paul literally jumps the fence. It’s correct to say, in that particular instance, that he “Hopped” and left. What wouldn’t make sense is to talk about hope in this scenario, which makes “Hoped” inappropriate to be used here.

As long as you use each of the words correctly – both for meaning and tense, you should be fine.

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Hoped

“Hoped” is the past tense of the word “Hope”, which relates to a good feeling about what we expect will happen. The past tense, as in “Hoped” is used to share what were the “Hopes” in a moment in time, that may or may not have been confirmed.

According to The Cambridge Dictionary, “Hope” is “something good that you want to happen in the future, or a confident feeling about what will happen in the future”.

Let’s take a look at some useful examples:

  1. I hoped that Carla would like the gift we got her.
  2. Thomas hoped that they remembered his birthday last week.
  3. Julia hoped that her first day at work would go well.
  4. They hoped that Paul would enjoy the food they cooked.
  5. We hoped that our sister would forgive us after the fight.

Hopped

“Hopped” is the past tense of the word “Hop”, which describes jumping around with one foot. Figuratively, it can also indicate going somewhere or getting into a vehicle quickly. Either way, when using the past tense “Hopped” we’re describing something that has already happened.

The Cambridge Dictionary agrees with the definitions above and adds that “Hopped” can also relate to how a small animal (like a bunny) would move around, jumping in one or two feet.

Take a look at the examples below:

  1. Chasten hopped over the objects scattered on the floor.
  2. Monica quickly hopped into her car and drove away after she saw Peter.
  3. I hopped to my feet and ran over to join them in the garden.
  4. Clark happily hopped out of bed to begin his day.
  5. Manuella hopped on top of the rock and asked me to take a picture of her.

Which Is Used the Most?

“Hoped” and “Hopped” aren’t synonyms. But we’re still interested in finding out which one of those words is used more often.

Take a look at the graph from Google Ngram Viewer below.

hoped or hopped usage

“Hoped” is used much more frequently than “Hopped”. We think this is the case, because “Hope” is a much more common word, while “Hop” has strict use and doesn’t pop up so frequently.

However, we must not forget that both forms are correct and can be incorporated into your vocabulary. You can say “Hoped” or “Hopped” and rest assured that you are correct and makes sense.

Final Thoughts

“Hoped” and “Hopped” are correct, and can be used,  if you do it properly. They have different meanings. “Hoped” is the past tense of “Hope”, the confidence that things will turn out alright. “Hopped” is the past tense of “Hop”, which means going places or getting into a car quickly.