Have a Nap or Take a Nap – Difference Explained (UK vs. US)

Have you ever heard or said the words “have a nap” or “take a nap” before? Is there any difference, and why this difference? This article aims to provide answers to these questions and to show examples that point to where and when these statements can be made. 

Difference Between “Have a Nap” and “Take a Nap”

“Have a nap” and “take a nap” both mean the same thing. They are both correct and can be used interchangeably. The only difference is the words “have” and “take”. However, there is no difference between each term. “Take a nap” is mostly used in the US and UK. 

Have a Nap or Take a Nap

For example,

  • Peter needs to have a nap after that rigorous game.
  • Peter needs to take a nap after that rigorous game.

The two sentences above have the same meaning.

The word “Nap” by itself means a short sleep. Therefore, to “take a nap” or “have a nap” is simply to carry out the action of taking or having a short sleep.

Here are more examples of how to use the terms in a sentence:

  • We all need to take a nap after the dance rehearsal.
  • Don’t forget to have a nap when you get home.

Taking a short sleep in the afternoon is always considered a way to rest after having lunch or after a hectic task.

Watch the video: Only 1 percent of ...
Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

Have a Nap

The term “have a nap” refers to taking a short sleep or rest during the afternoon. It is a culture for some people to sleep after lunch. So, you can say, “I want to have a nap” whenever you want to take a short sleep during the day

The phrase “have a nap” is a singular simple present tense. It is grammatically correct to say “have a nap”. 

Below are examples of how the expression can be used in a sentence.

  1. Can I have a nap while everybody is studying?
  2. Henry loves to have a nap whenever he comes back from school.
  3. I may pause working because I want to have a nap.
  4. She is having a nap.
  5. Why don’t you go and have a nap?
  6. She needs to have a nap.

Take a Nap

The term “take a nap” is grammatically correct. The phrase is used when a person wants to sleep or rest, usually during the day. To “take a nap” is simply to get a short sleep during the day. For example, you can say, “I want to take a nap”.

“Take a nap” has the same meaning as “have a nap”. They can be used interchangeably in a sentence, and the meaning of the sentence will not be altered. 

  1. I think Mary is taking a nap.
  2. She took a nap in the afternoon 
  3. I’m going to take a nap once I’m done cooking.
  4. Sharon is taking a nap.
  5. I took a nap for about an hour.
  6. I may give up soon and take a nap.
  7. Michael takes a nap after his football game.

Have a Nap or Take a Nap in American English?

According to the Google Ngram Viewer graph, the term “take a nap” is by far used the most in America. The red line in the graph indicates the data usage of “take a nap,” while the blue line shows the usage of “have a nap”. 

Have a Nap or Take a Nap US

“Take a nap” is more common in America because of how simple and correct a “take a nap” sounds.

Have a Nap or Take a Nap in British English?

According to the Google Ngram Viewer graph, the term “take a nap” is more used in British English. The red line in the graph indicates the data usage of “take a nap,” while the blue line shows the usage of “have a nap”.

Have a Nap or Take a Nap UK

This is because “take a nap” sounds easier and grammatically correct. However, both phrases are correct to use.

The words “take a nap” and “have a nap” are both the same in context. The differences are the use of the verbs “take” and “have”. However, this doesn’t change their meaning.

Both UK and US do have a lot of words that have the same but different spellings or a slight difference in spellings.