Everytime or Every time? Here’s the #1 rule to remember if “everytime” is one word

When it comes to writing in the English Language, many different rules must be followed. Firstly there is keeping in mind that some words sound the same but are spelled differently and are used in different contexts (there, their and they’re). Then there is the fact that there are many different words that have the same meaning, called synonyms (Chilly and Cold). 

Then there are some words that, with the exception of just one or two characters seem to be the same, leaving the reader unsure as to which one is accurate. One example would be the words everytime or every time.

If you have ever struggled with which one is appropriate, then you’re in luck. This article will cover which spelling is correct, and the number one way to remember which words to use.

Is “Everytime” or “Every time” Grammatically Correct?

Many words have become commonplace as compound words where space is not used such as in “everywhere”. However, the form “every time” does include a space between the two words. “Everytime” (with no space) is not considered a word in American English.

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The Number #1 Rule to Remember if Everytime or Every time is Correct:

“Everytime” is not a word. It should always have a space between the two words.

7 Examples Showing the Correct Spelling

The following are some examples of how to use the word “every time” with an incorrect sentence followed by the correct sentence.

Incorrect: My brother eats all the pizza everytime we order it.

Correct: My brother eats all the pizza every time we order it.

Incorrect: “You can’t keep skipping class everytime you don’t like the topic.”

Correct: “You can’t keep skipping class every time you don’t like the topic.”

Incorrect: I love to play video games evertime I come home from school.

Correct: I love to play video games every time I come home from school.

Incorrect: Everytime he finishes a drink, he puts the can in the trash.

Correct: Every time he finishes a drink, he puts his can in the trash.

Incorrect: I can’t come and help you everytime there is a crisis.

Correct: I can’t come and help you every time there is a crisis.

Incorrect: The book is better than the movie everytime.

Correct: The book is better than the movie every time.

Incorrect: Everytime I eat a sandwich, I put mayonnaise on it.

Correct: Every time I eat a sandwich, I put mayonnaise on it.

Mistaking “Everytime” for a compound word

In the English language, words that combine to form new words and a new meaning are called compound words. Compound words come in many different forms. Some have two words with a space in between, others have a dash between them, while others still have no space between them at all. The rules for compound words can be confusing, and it is normally something that is picked up by native English speakers. However, there are some subtle differences to go over when studying compound words.

Compound Words With a Hyphen

Some words use a hyphen to denote a compound word. For example, the words “Father-in-Law” should be hyphenated and is considered a compound word. As a general rule of thumb when writing compound words with hyphens, a hyphen should be used on two words if they are a compound adjective that modifies a noun. For example, take the phrase, “Long-term solution”. The words “long-term” are modifying the word “solution”, and so a hyphen is necessary.

Is “Everytime” a compound word?

No. The word “Everytime” is not a compound word. Numerous compound words have no spaces between them. For example, “bookstore” is considered to be a compound word today without a space. In history, the word “book store” was used as a way to show the reader what kind of store this was. An example of a compound word that does have a space between them would be “grocery store”.