Don’t count your chickens before they hatch: Meaning, synonyms & origin + 9 example sentences

What does “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch” mean?

“Don’t count your chickens before they hatch” means don’t put your faith in something that hasn’t happened yet. It means to not hold your breath for all of your dreams to come true. The phrase has the connotative meaning of assuming something before having it, it also means that one must not openly express his success until one successfully achieves it.

9 examples of how to use “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch” in a sentence

  • He had counted his chickens before they hatched, that’s why he is unable to face the society.
  • Work hard and prove your worth in a practical way, counting your chickens before they hatch will embarrass you.
  • Natasha counted her chickens before they hatched, after the results she was totally upset for her celebrations which she had before.
  • I don’t like to count my chickens before they hatch, I will celebrate and show my success at the right moment.
  • Don’t count your chickens before they hatch, it’s not easy to satisfy the clients before completing the task.
  • Angelina is silly, every time she use to count her chickens before they hatch. After results we notice a different Angelina.
  • My father has advised me to not count the chickens before they hatch, because it can be embarrassing to do so.
  • Our teachers in their every class use to repeat the phrase “don’t count your chickens before they hatch”. Most students used to do it and after the results they cry.
  • You must wait till you receive the recommendation letter, counting the chickens before they hatch will make you upset.
  • If you will count the chickens before they hatch, then I will never work with you.
  • I always feel embarrassment when my father starts to count the chickens before they hatch.

The origin of “Don’t count the chickens before they hatch”

This is a very ancient term that is thought to have originated in many various cultures and ways. It also appears in a story from Aesop’s fables, which were written between 600 and 550 BC.

The idiom has its origin in one of famous Urdu story named as “Sheikh Chilli, the day dreamer” The story of Sheikh Chilli is:

“Once he was sitting on the side wall of the road, a merchant with a huge pot of oil came to him and straight away said, “Will you please carry my pot to the market, I will give you five rupees for the job.” Sheikh Chilli found the deal profitable, and agreed. He picked the pot and walked with the merchant. On the way he thought, when the merchant will give me five rupees, I will buy eggs with them. Then I will hatch those eggs. Chickens will come out of them. When they will grow, they will be fully fledged hens and cocks. They will lay more eggs. I will hatch them all, and then I will have plenty of poultry. Then I will sell them all and will purchase the goats. The goats will deliver lambs and then in due course I will have a number of goats. Then I will sell them all and d will purchase cows. I will sell cow’s milk and thus will earn lot of money”.

Synonyms for “Don’t count the chickens before they hatch”

Day dreamer, to celebrate before the results,  assuming something before having it.

Idioms related to “Don’t count the chickens before they hatch”

  • Castle in the air
  • Blue skies
  • Brown study
  • Head is in the clouds
  • Pipe dream
  • Away with the fairies
  • Out of this world