Batchelor or Bachelor – Which Spelling Is Correct?

When you refer to a single man, do you call him a “Batchelor” or a “Bachelor”?

Since those forms are similar, we want to know which is correct and which one to avoid. Also, we want to know what’s the meaning of the word and how to properly use it.

Batchelor or Bachelor – Which Spelling Is Correct?

“Bachelor” is the correct spelling for the word that indicates a man who is old enough to get married but hasn’t done so yet. It can also relate to education, i.e. Bachelor’s Degree. “Batchelor” is a common misspelling of the word “Bachelor” and, as such, should be avoided.

batchelor or bachelor

Take a look at the examples below:

  • When is Frank’s batchelor’s party? (incorrect)
  • When is Frank’s bachelor’s party?

The correct form for the word we’re looking into here is “Bachelor”, without the “t”. That’s the acceptable form you can use to talk about a “Bachelor” you know, a “Bachelor’s” party, a “Bachelor” pad, etc.

“Batchelor” is incorrect and although it’s a common misspelling, it should never be used. Once you know a word is incorrect you should scratch it off completely, and do your best to use only the correct form of the word.

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Watch the video: Only 1 percent of our visitors get these 3 grammar questions right...

Batchelor

“Batchelor” is a common misspelling for the word “Bachelor”, which indicates a single man who is eligible for marriage, but hasn’t decided to get married yet. As with any incorrect form, “Batchelor” should be avoided and never used.

Is “Batchelor” a word, some people might be asking? The Cambridge Dictionary says it isn’t. It doesn’t recognize “Batchelor” as a word at all, which is only more reason to never use this form.

Let’s take a look at some examples that include the incorrect form “Batchelor”, followed by a corrected version of the same sentence.

  1. Sam is a batchelor, and I don’t think he’s looking to change his status. (incorrect)
  2. Sam is a bachelor, and I don’t think he’s looking to change his status.
  1. Jack was a batchelor until he was 37. (incorrect)
  2. Jack was a bachelor until he was 37.
  1. Ashley has a batchelor’s degree in psychology. (incorrect)
  2. Ashley has a bachelor’s degree in psychology.

Bachelor

“Bachelor” is the correct spelling for the word that indicates a single man who’s yet to be married. You can use this word in your daily conversations because it’s appropriate and very common.

The Cambridge Dictionary agrees with our definition of the word, saying that “Bachelor” is “a man who has never married”.

Also, “Bachelor” is used in connection to a college degree. The first college degree someone can get (male or female) is called a “Bachelor’s Degree”.

Let’s see some good, helpful examples:

  1. John is a confirmed bachelor.
  2. Paula will be the first woman in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree.
  3. Though the bachelor had never been married, he’d been in many relationships.
  4. Ryan was the most popular bachelor in town.
  5. He’ll be graduating with a bachelor’s degree next Spring.

Besides being used to indicate an individual, “Bachelor” is used in connection to other things. For example, before their wedding, is traditional that a groomsman will throw the groom a “Bachelor’s Party”.

Likewise, the place where a “Bachelor” lives is often referred to as a “Bachelor Pad”.

Which Is Used the Most?

Which one of those forms is used more often, “Batchelor” or “Bachelor”? Take a look at the graph from Google Ngram Viewer below.

batchelor or bachelor usage

As we expected, “Bachelor” is the most frequently used word. This is what was expected because “Bachelor” is the correct spelling for this word and this is what people should be using in their sentences.

“Batchelor” appears closer to the bottom of the graph. We wouldn’t say it’s rarely used, but the fact that some people use a word doesn’t mean it’s correct or acceptable. Keep that in mind and always avoid using the word “Batchelor”.

Final Thoughts

“Bachelor” is the correct form for the word that relates to a man old enough or expected to get married but hasn’t yet done so. It can also be used in relation to education, i.e. Bachelor’s Degree. “Batchelor” is a common misspelling for that word and should always be avoided.