A Lot of Friends vs. Lots of Friends – Difference Explained

Many people might wonder what the difference is between saying “a lot of friends” and saying “lots of friends”. They seem similar, but are they the same? Or do they have key differences? This article will clear up whatever questions you might have.

A Lot of Friends vs. Lots of Friends

Both “a lot of friends” and “lots of friends” are expressions that imply the presence of several friends. They are freely interchangeably expressions, with little difference between them. Both expressions are also very casual and informal, and should therefore be avoided in formal contexts.

A Lot of Friends vs. Lots of Friends

You may use “a lot of friends” and “lots of friends” interchangeably in conversation without the meaning of your sentences changing, as both expressions convey multiple friends.

One can argue that “lots of friends” implies several lots, while “a lot of friends” only talks about a singular lot, but without knowing the size of the lots this comparison is useless.

Some less casual alternatives for “a lot of friends” and “lots of friends” are “many friends” and “several friends”, or even “multitudes of friends”.

A Lot of Friends

“A lot of friends” is an expression used to talk about many friends. When you use “a lot of friends”, you’re not really talking about a specific number of friends, but rather implying the presence of a sizable amount of friends.

You can use “a lot of friends” in casual conversation, and it’s a great way to talk about many friends in a way that your audience immediately understands, with no confusion.

Here are some example sentences that showcase how you can use “a lot of friends” in your daily life:

  1. He has a lot of friends, so every picture on his Instagram has different people in it.
  2. During my college years, I somehow managed to make a lot of friends, against all odds.
  3. She has a lot of friends that are always egging her on to do crazy, wild stuff.
  4. I have a lot of friends that are living abroad, out of the country, but I’m still living here.
  5. They have a lot of friends so you’ll never see them stay at home during weekends.

Lots of Friends

“Lots of friends” is used to bring up the idea of several friends to your audience in a quick and simple way. Using “lots of friends” is a very reliable way to quickly make your point about many friends.

“Lots of friends” is not an expression that talks about a specific number of friends, but rather it’s an expression that could be applied to a vast number of friend amounts and still be accurate.

These example sentences will teach you how to use “lots of friends” with no issues at all:

  1. She has lots of friends so of course she’s always going out and partying with all of them.
  2. Trust me, once you start classes you’re going to make lots of friends and be very popular.
  3. Lots of friends I hadn’t thought about in years messaged me to congratulate me online.
  4. He has lots of friends that are always doing incredibly cool things like hosting conferences.
  5. I have lots of friends that are willing to help you get to higher places in life.

“A Lot of Friends” or “Lots of Friends” In the US?

According to information provided by the US Google Ngram Viewer, “a lot of friends” is significantly more popular than “lots of friends” in the United States of America.

A Lot of Friends vs. Lots of Friends US

The information compiled showcases the fact that from the year 1900 until the year 1911, “lots of friends” was the more popular expression in the US.

However, in 1911 “a lot of friends” overtook “lots of friends” in popularity, and though both expressions have risen in popularity since, it has maintained its lead.

An interesting fact to analyze is that from 1942 until 1952, both expressions underwent a surge in popularity at equal rates, suggesting that there is a reason for both phrases to suddenly become more popular.

However, this surge was followed by a decrease in popularity, after which both expressions continued to grow at the usual rates.

“A Lot of Friends” or “Lots of Friends” In the UK?

According to the data compiled by the UK Google Ngram Viewer, in the United Kingdom “a lot of friends” is a more popular expression when compared to “lots of friends”.

A Lot of Friends vs. Lots of Friends UK

There are some really interesting facts you can find out by looking at the chart, such as the fact that in the first few years of the 20th century, both phrases quickly alternated in popularity.

Ever since 1913, “a lot of friends” has been more popular than “lots of friends” in the United Kingdom, though it has been close to being surpassed a few times.

Final Thoughts

“A lot of friends” and “lots of friends” are nearly equivalent expressions that can be freely exchanged in pretty much every context. They both refer to an ambiguous yet sizable amount of friends, and are very informal in their nature.